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Daily Mental Training Improves Mental HealthIt’s tragic that suicide by a famous person is what it takes to raise awareness about mental health. It’s even more tragic that this happens time after time.

One day a year has been reserved to spotlight this theme; World Mental Health Day is observed on October 10 each year, with the overall objective of raising awareness about mental health issues around the world and mobilizing efforts in support of mental health. One day a year is not enough. Children should learn about mental health while they are in school. In order to do that we need to understand that we consist of a physical, outer part and a mental, inner part, and that these need to be in balance to cope with challenges in our daily life.

We have a physical body and a mind. It’s essential to understand the importance of the mind in order to live a meaningful and good life. Simply put, the physical is what happens outside the head, and the mental is what goes on inside the head. Exactly what goes on in each person’s head varies according to the basics we have learned about different subjects, which again will vary according to one’s own childhood and environment.

We learn a lot about physical exercise and how important it is, but we don’t learn much about mental training, and that it relates to our mental as well as physical health. What is mental training, and why is it important for our mental health?

Mental means regarding the mind, and training means exercise. The definition of mental training is simple and logical: exercise of the mind in order to reach a desired physical result. Many exercise physically, but don’t understand the importance of the mind and mental thoughts. Your thoughts influence your body, it’s that simple. It is important that whatever is inside the head influences the body in a good way, for the body is the tool we use to achieve the physical results we desire.

There are many myths about mental training. Some believe that if we do mental work it means that we have psychological problems, or that it’s only for athletes. Old myths must be cleared away in order for society to develop.

We all use our mental abilities the moment we start to think, but few deliberately exercise mentally, or we inadvertently exercise by entertaining repetitive negative thoughts like: I can’t do that, it’s not possible or it’s just impossible. On the other hand, repeating affirmations—positive sentences—to oneself is good mental training, and it’s even better when done while meditating. Using your imagination to envision that you’ve reached an important goal is also beneficial mental training, just as athletes do. You can, for example, prepare for meetings, interviews or conversations that you might find challenging.

If we remember that we also consist of a mental, inner part—and train it just as we exercise physically, we will be able to avoid many mental afflictions that result in suicide.


 

Article Author: Deborah Borgen is a pioneer in consciousness training and the founder and CEO of www.uniquemind.org. She is an international speaker and author of Magical Moments: Discover How to Easily Create More in Your Daily Life, a step-by step manual to gain inner peace so that world peace can be achieved. Her near-death experiences revealed to her the code for unlimited powers of the mind. Magical Moments is based on Deborah’s course that creates a paradigm shift in human evolution. Her course has been documented by research. An article in a scientific journal is currently underway that reveals a great leap within mind development.

Article References:
Magical Moments: Discover How to Easily Create More in Your Daily Life by Deborah Borgen
http://uniquemind.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=551&Itemid=1038
http://www.sportpsychologytoday.com/sport-psychology-for-coaches/what-is-mental-training/
http://www.upmc.com/Services/sports-medicine/services/performance/mental/Pages/default.aspx

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